Technistas

Matthew D. Laudato writes about software and technology

Speedy Java builds slow down productivity

with 2 comments

I never cease to be amazed at how software development management ignores the build problem. In a recent article in SDTimes, Alex Handy reports on a survey undertaken by RedMonk that found Java developers spend nearly 8 minutes per hour doing software builds. In round numbers, that’s an hour a day, 5 hours a week, and for a typical 48 week year, nearly 30 work days every year. Let me repeat that. Your Java developers, who are presumably paid $80-120k per year, are spending 30 days per year staring at their screens waiting for builds. If we take the middle of this range, this is a productivity loss of over $12,000 per year per developer. For a small 5-10 person team, you could hire an extra developer just with the savings from improving your build process.

The article goes on to say that Java developers “have learned to build smaller portions of their projects at a time, or to compile small pieces of code and inject them into running applications”. I’m trying to think of two worse practices in professional software development. If you build a smaller portion of your project, you risk having unsatisfied dependencies, and thus wasting time when your runtime fails to operate properly. Similarly, injecting code into a running application is dangerous even in a test environment for similar reasons – you haven’t spent any time understanding the dependencies, and therefore are at risk of dependency-related failures.

As my readers know, I work for a software company (OpenMake Software) that sells a software build and workflow automation product. We have tens of thousands of Java developers using our product through our Eclipse plugin, which gives you true incremental builds that take dependencies into account. You can build, test and do a test deploy all from within Eclipse, and not have to resort to trickery such as injecting partial code into your test server. Since the cost of Meister (which I am not at liberty to publish here) is significantly less per developer than the annual productivity loss calculated above, it makes sense for development managers to move their Java developers away from the wild west of desktop builds, and consider a formal build system. Anything less and you’re ignoring one of your primary missions as a manager: controlling the development process.

Happy Building!

– Matt

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Written by Matthew D. Laudato

December 3, 2009 at 8:27 pm

2 Responses

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  1. […] builds have been on my mind lately. This is a cross post of a blog I did on my personal site, https://technistas.com/2009/12/03/speedy-java-builds-slow-down-productivity/, that reviews an article from SD Times. The article tells us that Java developers spend around 5 […]

  2. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Kevin E. Schlabach, matthewdlaudato. matthewdlaudato said: Speedy Java builds slow down productivity: http://wp.me/paGSU-1N […]


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